A few days ago one of the girls in the Digital Nomad Girls Facebook Group, Linn, asked for inspirational input on female role-models and feminist heroines.

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Her shout out sparked a really interesting conversation and within half an hour she had received over a dozen responses. By the time I woke up the next morning, more than 50 girls had shared and discussed their role-models. So I thought it would be a shame to lose all this information and inspiration in the depths of our busy Facebook Group and decided to turn the info into a blog post that we can all read and learn from. Because going through 58 comments and counting is quite a lot of work I decided to pick 10 answers by 10 Digital Nomad Girls.

Here we go, 10 Digital Nomad Girls share their female role-models:

 

Yoga Girl Book Cover Photo

Rachel Brathen/Yoga Girl

by Kris Oak – Health Coach

Rachel Brathen is the person that made me realise how important self-love & self-care are. Her book Yoga Girl was the 1st book I ever read in my life that reall touched me on a personal level. She made me see for the 1st time, that it’s ok to sometimes have shit days and cry, that you don’t always have to be strong and that no matter what past you had, you deserve to have a great future.

 

Lean In Book Cover

Sheryl Sandberg

by Katharina Kunze – University Admissions Consultant

My favourite role model is Sheryl Sandberg. She speaks to me in so many ways: 1) She is a (now single) mother with a high-powered job 2) She comes off as feminine and vulnerable, and not an “ass-hole”. She is someone I can identify with 3) The issues she raised in her book ‘Lean In’ really spoke to my heart and seemed well-reflected and balanced. She wrote a book that men also read, which I think is not so common among feminism books 4) She kick-started a conversation, at least for me, that had not been there in that form before 5) She manages to do all these things without, seemingly, alienating anyone. I am deeply impressed by her personally and that she comes across as so kind, personable and genuine as well. I also deeply respect Anne-Marie Slaughter and her husband, Andrew Moravcsik. Both have modelled a relationship where he is or was for a long time the “primary parent” taking care of their sons. They also spoke and wrote openly about the challenges they faced individually with that set up and as a family in The Atlantic. These were again incredibly enlightening and genuine-appearing articles.

 

J.K. Rowling

by Marta Ferreira – Graphic Designer

As nerd as this may sound, I have to say J.K. Rowling. Besides her amazing imaginative and creative mind, I absolutely admire the way she has fought for her work. She went through poverty and depression but transformed that into fuel for her writing and will to carry on. And after reaching gargantuan success, she kept her principles and generosity. Sher never forgot her past, never turned back from those who helped her, and keeps giving back. Awesome, even for a muggle.

 

Frida Kahlo

by Marina – Travel Blogger at My Dear Lola

Although experiencing lifelong health problems, what marred her for life was the traffic accident she suffered when she was 18 which made her be skewered by a metal handrail. Her injuries recovery isolated her from other people, and this influenced her works where symbolic portrayals of pain, physical and psychological wounds, skeletons and other grim images can be observed. Kahlo never gave up and kept painting form bed claiming; “I paint myself because I am so often alone and because I am the subject I know best”. She used to draw on personal experiences; her marriage, her miscarriages, and her numerous operations. She insisted, “I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality” and being influenced by indigenous Mexican culture, which is apparent in her use of bright colours and dramatic symbolism. Frida lived her life to the fullest, despite immense pain, handicaps, and suffering. She had a gift for communicating her emotions to the world through painting.

 

Gabby Bernstein The Universe Has Your Back Book Cover

Gabby Bernstein

by Sian Peters – Strengths Coach and Blogger

This woman has changed my life. Really. No BS. No hyperbole. She has changed my life. I met Gabby when I was at a particularly low point. I don’t remember exactly how she came to me [I was a little fuzzy at the time] but my gosh am I glad she did. She has overcome some serious obstacles of her own to develop into an international morale booster and spiritual teacher. In her new book ‘The Universe Has Your Back’ she shares techniques to keep you sane, to keep you from straying off the path of happiness and into oncoming traffic. And it works. It all works. I’ve been recommending her book to my friends and they’re telling me that they’ve found peace and wisdom in her words. She is what I aspire to. In order to change the world you must start with yourself, overcome your own challenges and obstacles, and then inspire others to do the same. I’m firmly on that road, and while I have a long way to go, Gabby is helping me get there. The universe has my back!

Ada Lovelace

by Nina Tomala – Writer and blogger

My unlikely heroine is 19th century lady-turned-mathematician Countess Ada Lovelace, daughter of Romantic author Lord Byron: She’s famous for being the first computer programmer in the world – a hundred years before modern pioneers of informatics, in a field nowadays dominated by men. She worked extensively on the Analytical Engine, the first Turing-complete mechanical computer proposed in 1837 by Charles Babbage. Her notes include the first algorithm tailored for implementation on a computer. Even though the Analytical Engine existed only on paper due to lack of funds to construct it, Countess Ada realized its potential to solve problems of any complexity beyond merely crunching numbers. She also anticipated the later distinction between hardware and software. A Lady, a visionary, and a geek!

Felicia Day

by Susannah Bruck – Freelance Writer

Felicia Day has become one of my biggest creative inspirations in the last few years. The mastermind behind the web series The Guild, she’s risen from obscurity to become a nerd icon for strong women everywhere. She’s honest, vulnerable, and relatable in her autobiography, showing that if you just go out and DO something, create something, you can make your dreams come true. She was also a home-schooler like me! We’re not just weirdos after all!

Miki Agrawal Book Cover

Miki Agrawal

by Jenny – Digital Nomad Girls

My latest role model is Miki Agrawal, serial social entrepreneur and founder of Thinx, the first period proof underwear. Through the Thinx pants she has started an open and honest discussion about the ‘taboo’ topic of menstruation. In the developing world, having your period can have serious consequences for women and girls. Often they are shunned by their families and community, girls aren’t allowed to attend school during their periods and only few women have access to safe and hygienic products. Miki Agrawal is a fierce feminist and recently wrote her first book ‘Do Cool S**t’ in which she teaches you to follow your passions and start your own meaningful company.

Alicia Silverstone

by Marta – Blogger at VeganBTravels

Beautiful inside and out, she’s been proving you can be your natural self and conquer the world. To me, she represents the ultimate icon of success: an accomplished, respected star who has kept her uniqueness all the way despite tough showbiz reality. Plus she uses her fame to advocate cruelty-free lifestyle – an earthly angel.

Brene Brown

by Janneke Dijkhuis – Adventurer

As a researcher and storyteller Brene Brown took on the topics vulnerability, shame and courage. How they affect us and how we can deal with these emotions and feelings. These topics are for many very sensitive subjects that we do not like to discuss publicly, but Brene does it anyway. And the woman is doing it in a way that you think she is talking about you. About the parts of you that you don’t want to expose because you think no one else has these struggles that trigger shame and make you feel vulnerable. In Brene’s talks and books, you’ll find self-mocking, jokes and funny anecdotes which make it clear that the struggle is not only real for you which made me feel empowered.

 

There you have it, 10 female role-models to inspire you and learn from. Who is your female role model? Please share in the comments!

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